I’ve presented these articles which I have written because I feel they offer good information for my clients. Reading them at your leisure will help you better understand your situation. If you have any questions regarding what you’ve read here, especially how it may relate to your own family law issue, please feel free to contact my office. We will be happy to arrange a consultation to discuss all your questions.

Telling It To The Judge

Heading to court for many family law litigants is a scary process; a trip many litigants will try and avoid all together during their family law matter. Indeed, courtroom proceedings are unpredictable and can become costly with attorneys and witnesses present, too. Litigants often wonder if the judge will be in a good mood, whether the judge reviewed the pleadings, … Continued

New Year, New Laws

As divorce lawyers, we understand that divorce is fundamentally about change and an essential element of our jobs is guiding our clients through that change. New family structure. New bank accounts. New furniture. New schedules. A new normal. Each year family law lawyers are tasked with the additional job of learning and understanding the new laws, statutes and case holdings … Continued

Signed, Sealed, and Not Delivered: The Religious “Prenup”

Prior to marriage, many couples believe that, in accordance with religious traditions, they are signing a prenuptial agreement. However, they are likely mistaken.  Religious agreements, such as Ketubahs and Mahrs, often (and likely) contradict California law on prenuptial agreements. 

Pets in Divorce

Reprinted from the January 9, 2019, Los Angeles Daily Journal, Marlo Van Oorschot’s and Cara Boroda’s article titled “Is the California Family Code going to the dogs?” explores the new statute about pets in a divorce, often referred to as pet custody. Download Pets in Divorce here

Are You a “Free -Range Parent”?

For years we’ve heard about “Helicopter Parents”, a style of parenting many feel is the overprotection of children, perhaps to the detriment of children as they mature into adults. When I was a child, I don’t remember a label being placed on my parents’ “style” of parenting. In fact, I do not think they even knew what their style was … Continued

To Delay, Or Not to Delay, that is The Question

The decision to file for divorce is not just a legal action—a lawsuit—but also a deeply personal and important decision. In fact, it may arguably be one of the most monumental decisions a person may make in their entire life. Thus, it is not surprising that many people delay the act of filing for divorce. Some people may be in … Continued

Tis’ the (Tax) Season

For individuals going through a divorce, or for those just contemplating a divorce, one of the big questions often posed by clients to divorce attorneys, as well as by prospective clients, is “should I file a joint return this year with my spouse”?

Hypothetically Speaking: The Trump Divorce and Custody

On Thursday, March 15, 2018, the New York Post broke the news that Donald Trump Jr., and his wife, Vanessa Trump, are heading their separate ways after 12 years of marriage and five children, ranging in age from 10 years old to 3 years old. The couple alleged in a joint statement that their decision to divorce[1] was not acrimonious, … Continued

If You Willfully Break It, You May Not Be Able To Fix It

Family law cases are fluid and dynamic. The cases are influenced by a variety of constantly changing factors, some simple like the child’s age; some more complicated by the loss of a job, a promotion, or the receipt of a significant bonus. Yet, while life may change during and after a family law proceeding, what cannot change–without either a written … Continued

Make Alimony Great Again…or Not?

The recent sweeping tax law, signed by President Donald Trump, known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), among other things disposed of the 75-year-old tax deduction for the payment of alimony (also known as spousal support). The deductibility of alimony paid by a spouse meant the recipient of alimony was to pay taxes on the receipt of this money.  … Continued